ABSINTHE MIXOLOGY

Absinthe, also known as the green fairy, has a high alcohol content. Traditional Absinthe expresses a natural green color, but they can also be clear. There’s a specific ritual done when serving this potent drink. 

How to Use an Absinthe Spoon

1. Absinthe Spoon and glass

A special spoon and glass are used to serve Absinthe. The spoon is made of stainless steel with a slotted design, while the glass is a chalice.

2. Sugar Cube

The absinthe spoon is where you place a sugar cube on top of a glass filled with Absinthe. The sugar adds a sweetness to the strong drink, which can help the drinker.

3. Water

Water slowly drips onto the glass as the sugar dissolves into the drink. The water comes from a unique fountain explicitly made for this beverage. Absinthe is high in alcohol content, and water helps dilute this.

History of Absinthe

Absinthe was introduced to France in the 1840s. The drink symbolized creativity and liberation, but also madness and despair. The name was derived from the Greek word absinthe meaning wormwood, from how it’s made.

Soaking wormwood leaves (Artemisia absinthium) in wine or spirits was the original way to create Absinthe. This supposedly aided childbirth and was prescribed for menstrual pain, jaundice, anemia, and rheumatism.

Its alcohol content can range from 40- 90%, which makes this a strong drink alone. The drink’s strength was so powerful; over drinking, it had its name for Alcohol Use Disorder called Absinthism.

Around 1915, Absinthe was banned for being one of the most dangerous spirits. It came back in the 1990s for its popularity. Now, nearly 200 brands are produced in countries like France, Switzerland, Austria, Germany, Netherlands, Spain, and the Czech Republic.

This opened opportunities for strong cocktails like Sazerac, Cocktail a la Louisiane, Death in the Afternoon, and Corpse Reviver #2. Well-known Absinthe drinkers are Marilyn Manson, Oscar Wilde, Vincent Van Gogh, and Ernest Hemingway.