What Is A Bar Spoon Equal To? Measurements That Make Or Break Drinks

Informational

Bartender behind the counter mixing drink using bar spoon

Have you ever come across a new cocktail recipe and it was using a different unit of measure rather than ounces? The primary purpose of a bar spoon is to stir drinks but it is also a great jigger alternative when measuring ingredients. One bar spoon equals 5ml of liquid or one standard teaspoon. If the measurements are multiplied right, the bar spoon can be used for other units of measure such as tablespoon and ounce.

How Much is a Bar Spoon in Milliliters and Ounces?

Next to ounces, milliliters is the second most commonly used measurement in cocktail recipes. A standard jigger only has oz. inscriptions, so it may be difficult to estimate the amount in milliliters.

Cocktail with barspoon and jigger

Instead of the jigger, you can just use a bar spoon. Just remember that one bar spoon is equivalent to 5ml or ⅙ oz. This is helpful because it is in five increments, so if a recipe calls for 10 ml, you can measure two bar spoons and so on.

It is important to note that there are different styles of bar spoons. The 5ml measurement refers to an American bar spoon, which is distinguishable by the red cap at the end of the handle. On the other hand, a European bar spoon has a flat end that is used to layer liqueurs and to muddle ingredients. Measurement-wise, it only holds 2.5ml or ⅛ oz. of liquid.

Is a Bar Spoon a Teaspoon?

Bartender mixing cocktail using a bar spoon

Interestingly, a teaspoon compared to a bar spoon differs in size, height, and range of purpose, but they measure the same. Since 5ml is equivalent to one teaspoon, then one bar spoon equals one teaspoon. Moreover, a European bar spoon is equal to, you guessed it, ½ teaspoon. In extension, 15ml or three teaspoons is equivalent to one tablespoon.

Conclusion

A bartender must know conversions of measurements, even just the simple ones like the bar spoon. This bar tool is not to be undermined because it has a lot of purpose in the bar. So next time you encounter a recipe stated in teaspoons or milliliters, grab your bar spoon and move on with your cocktail.

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