What Kind of Glass Do You Serve Rosé Wine In?

Wine has clearly made a very big impact on the lives of many people around the world. In fact, wine glass making alone has become a very important industry and almost all wine types and varietals have their specific wine glasses, mostly commissioned by the winemakers.  wine is not exempt from this. Called “the people’s wine”, rosé is the easiest wine to drink without the nuances of drinking red wines.

Different wine glass makers have come up with their designs for different wines, including the rosé. For sommeliers and connoisseurs who had years of training and experience, it may be easier to distinguish which wine glass goes best for which wine. However, for the layman wine drinker, it may be harder to decide.

This article aims to help the layman to pick out the best glass to serve his rosé wine.

What Kind Of Wine Glass Do You Serve Rose Wine In?

There are two basic types of rosé wine glasses in the market now - the tulip-shaped and the diamond-shaped - each claiming to highlight the features of the rosé wine.

For the general consuming public, one wine connoisseur suggests the white wine glass. The sleek design of the glass and the slightly tapered brim that directs the wine to the tip of the tongue so you can taste its sweetness and the acidity. The acidity induces the production of saliva. Saliva, however gross it may sound, actually works in how one tastes the wine so the correct type of glass where the wine is served can affect the taste and general acceptance of the rosé wine.

Alternatives

For college students, the best alternative to serving rosé wine, or any wine for that matter would be the red solo cups. The uninhibited experimentation of this age group borders insanity, if the elders are to conclude.

One pertinent wine reviewer tried to serve red wine in a coffee mug and a mason glass and concluded that the choice of the glass diminished the quality of the wine in terms of aroma and taste. She observed that the structure of the coffee mug and the thickness of the lip robs the drinker of the sensations of the wine as she cannot smell the aroma and the taste is rather flat.

She had a better experience of the mason jar though, so, between the two the better alternative would be a mason glass, simply because the mason glass has a slightly rounded bottom allowing her to swirl the wine. This pretty much tells the same for the rosé wine since we also aim for the sensations of aroma and taste.

Another connoisseur, though, commented that on the matter of having fun he could, for a few occasions forget the etiquette surrounding drinking wine and let go with whatever is available at hand.

So if you're looking for an alternative glass to serve rosé wine, find something with a thin lip and a round-bottomed glass. This emulates the shape of the glass you would generally serve your rosé wine and is better than a coffee mug.

Conclusion

In general, rosé wine may be the most understated wine in the history of wine drinking. The fact that it had been on and off the circulation for a very long time is a testimony that this wine is underappreciated. However, thanks to the millennials who favored the light color of the rosé wine compared to the more intimidating red wine and the bland white wines, the rosé wine had made a comeback in recent years.

That said, the controversy of the proper glass to serve rosé wine had also surfaced. In the end, the rosé is the kind of wine that you can serve anytime at any season and therefore crossed boundaries of specifications. If you need suggestions for proper wine glasses, check this article.


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