5 Myths Surrounding Absinthe That You Should Know

Informational

Absinthe with sugar cubes and a spoon

The widespread "green fairy" beverage was made in France. Absinthe was widespread in bars and later became associated as a beverage of poets. Though this drink was banned for many years, it preserved its composition. 

It is understandable that during its existence, absinthe has gained various myths. Some of them refer to the history of this drink while others are connected with its composition. You can even write a research paper concerning absinthe myths. 

But if you do not have time for research, you can always rely on a custom writing service and professional authors will finish your tasks in time. Thus, let's look at the biggest absinthe myths and dispel them.

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1. Absinthe is a Hallucinating Drink

This beverage has become an ingredient for many cocktails in modern times. But the first advertisement for absinthe appeared in the 19th century. This was when green fairy became one of the most widespread beverages in European culture. 

The advertisement portrayed this beverage with the mythical green fairy, saying that this drink could get you drunk quickly. With the help of this advertisement, absinthe became well-known in a short period. After that, a myth appeared that the "green fairy" could change the minds of people.

But is it correct to consider this green liquid as a hallucinating drink? You may be surprised, but this beverage does not have hallucinogenic properties. The appearance of the green fairy was simply a PR move to create hype around the beverage.

However, absinthe possesses in its composition an herb that is known as wormwood. And many people believe that if they drink this beverage with wormwood, they will have strange visuals. But there is nothing magical in the "green fairy". 

This green liquid has the same effects as other alcoholic drinks, for example, whisky, cognac, and vodka. You will simply feel rejuvenated. Absinthe has a more pronounced aroma of spices but possesses the dizziness effect that is similar to other alcoholic beverages.

2. “Green Fairy” was Prohibited as a Hallucinating Drink

Green Absinthe Sugar Cube

"Green fairy" is not a hallucinating drink. But why was absinthe prohibited in the majority of European countries and the U.S. in the early 20th century? In those times, there was a story. 

It was about a farmer who fell into a binge and killed his wife and children. On that day, he had drunk large amounts of wine, cognac, brandy, and only two glasses of absinthe. After that, the public started to accuse the hallucinatory effect of the "green fairy" that caused these murders. This is how anti-absinthe public opinion appeared.

But in reality, absinthe has suffered because of its rapid popularity. The French wine industry could not reconcile with its competitor. That's why wine lobbyists started to claim that wine was a French drink while drinking the "green fairy" was unpatriotic, and this drink made people crazy.

After that, the "green fairy" was prohibited in the US, and the majority of the European countries involving France, the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland, and Austria-Hungary.

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3. Absinthe Originated in the Czech Republic

One of the biggest absinthe myths is that it originated in the Czech Republic. Many people believe in it due to the marketing campaigns of Czech distributors. But if we remember history, we will understand that it is just a myth. 

The "green fairy" was presumably created by Dr. Pierre Ordinaire. It was prescribed at first as medicine for health problems. But later, it became popular among painters and poets because of alluring green fairy tales.

In the Czech Republic, absinthe became popular only in the early 1860s. What is more, is that a ban on absinthe was not spread in the country. This meant that they continued to produce the "green fairy" until the end of World War II. 

After that, its production was banned by the communist regime. But after its fall, the Czech Republic wanted to revive the absinthe culture. This is one of the factors which gave rise to the myth of this beverage’s origin.

4. Adding Flaming Sugar Cube as Part of Absinthe Ritual

Traditional Set for Drinking Absinthe

During the development of the "green fairy" beverage, another marketing move was created. It began to show that the best method to enjoy the beverage was to serve it with a flaming sugar cube. 

It has become some kind of absinthe ritual. But true absinthe lovers will tell you that such a serving will just spoil the real flavors of the beverage.

The classic absinthe ritual includes putting a sugar cube on a spoon and dripping water slowly. It should be done above the glass of the beverage. In the past, it was carried out to cover the bitterness of the poor beverage. 

Nowadays, if you order absinthe in the bar and notice that the barman takes a sugar cube, soaks it with alcohol, and lights it with a match, it means he believes in an old myth of flaming sugar cube.

It is not recommended to drink this beverage straight because the "green fairy" possesses a strong flavor and high alcohol content, causing acute alcohol intoxication.

5. Absinthe is a Liquor

Those people who have never tried absinthe believe in one of the biggest absinthe myths that it is a strong liquor. But let us not get confused. 

Liquor is a beverage made from some alcohol and sugar, while absinthe in high-proof alcohol. It is like a gin. The only distinction is in the selection of flavoring differs.

Conclusion

Despite its numerous myths, many people are resolved to try absinthe. Some companies began to change the production of the "green fairy" by adding more flavors to the classic recipe. 

The history of the “green fairy” is worth deep research. You possibly even decided to analyze this question profoundly to dispel some myths or perhaps you are writing your term paper on the subject. In any case, we hope this blog answered some of your questions.

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